Leadership and Peer Support

SAS has some exciting news to share!

Leadership and Peer Support is growing! We now have offices in:

  • Blacktown (covers the Sydney area)

  • Katoomba (covers the Blue Mountains area)

  • Gosford (covers the Central Coast area)

Our office in Gosford has also been featured in the Coast Community Chronicle. 

What is Leadership and Peer Support?

We provide two types of FREE training to people with intellectual disability: 

  • Peer Support 
  • Leadership
Click on one of the squares below for more information: 

Our Team

Ross Lewis

Leadership Development Coordinator

0409 670 119

ross@sasinc.com.au

Blacktown

Contact us:

(02) 9622 3005

laps.blacktown@sasinc.com.au

Suite 214, Level 2
30-32 Campbell Street, Blacktown NSW

Luke Wheatley

New Leaders and Peer Support (LAPS) Program Officer

Karen Gorman

New Leaders and Peer Support (LAPS) Program Officer

Katoomba

Contact us:

0434 499 759

laps.katoomba@sasinc.com.au

29 Parke Street, Katoomba NSW 2780

Elouisa West

New Leaders and Peer Support (LAPS) Team Leader

Erin Kuch

New Leaders and Peer Support (LAPS) Program Officer

Gosford

Contact us:

0401 150 048

laps.gosford@sasinc.com.au

Suite 5, 72-82 Mann Street
Gosford NSW 2250

Ben Brown

New Leaders and Peer Support (LAPS) Program Officer

Yvonne Berry-Porter

New Leaders and Peer Support (LAPS) Program Officer

We are looking for New Leaders at Self Advocacy Sydney. 

Since June 2019, Self Advocacy Sydney (SAS) has been funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency to give leadership training to people with intellectual disability.

This funding can help people with intellectual disability to become future SAS leaders.

SAS leaders help other people with intellectual disability to speak for themselves.

SAS leaders also help people understand that people with intellectual disability should be part of the community, just like everyone.

New SAS leaders will help even more people with intellectual disability to speak for themselves.

New SAS leaders will help SAS to do its important work.

Leadership Development

We will look at your potential to be a leader, not just what you have already done.

SAS uses “selection criteria” to pick which people can be a new leader.

Here are some of our selection criteria. Let us know if you would like to see all of the selection criteria.

  1. Must Have:
  • Have an intellectual disability, there is no age limit.
  • Want to help other people with an intellectual disability to become self-advocates.
  • Able to speak up for yourself.
 
  1. Good to have:
  • Able to use technology like a smart phone, social media and the internet.

SAS leaders can do many different things. Some of these things are:

  • Coming up with new ideas.
  • Training other people.
  • Becoming a SAS staff member (paid or volunteer).
  • Giving peer support.
  • Speaking to community organisations about SAS.
  • Helping to organise social events.

Sometimes it might take a while for new SAS leaders to learn to do these things.

Sometimes new SAS leaders might have to wait until positions are available, like being on the board.

Even though new SAS leaders might have to wait until positions are available, they can still keep learning to be a leader.

Sometimes a new SAS leader can do some leadership things quickly like running a group or helping with social activities.

Leadership Plans

Each new SAS leader will choose what is best for them.

Some training may be in other languages.  Some training may have a deaf interpreter.

We can meet face to face.  We can use things like Skype, Facetime, Messenger or a phone call.

Some of the things SAS can do are:

  • SAS will run training.
  • People outside SAS can help with training.
  • We can find a mentor. A mentor is an experienced leader who can help new leaders.
  • We can meet new leaders one-to-one and in a group of other new SAS leaders.
  • Work experience as a leader at SAS.

Here are some things new SAS leaders might learn.

  • Speaking up for yourself.
  • Listening skills.
  • Developing confidence in talking to a group of people.
  • Running small groups.
  • How to influence the community about inclusion of people with intellectual disability.
  • How to provide peer support. This is called being a Peer Leader.
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